Rachel Kramer Bussel RSS

Books, writing, travel, art, randomness. For more information, visit www.rachelkramerbussel.com and my calendar for upcoming events in Seattle, Portland (Oregon), Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland (Maine), Chicago, Milwaukee and NYC. I'm also teaching an online 4-week erotica writing class for LitReactor starting October 16, 2014. See also Cupcakes Take the Cake and the possibly NSFW Lusty Lady. Check out my latest erotica anthologies Hungry for More, The Big Book of Submission and The Big Book of Orgasms: 69 Sexy Stories. rachelkramerbussel at gmail.com

Archive

Sep
8th
Mon
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disabilityinkidlit:

Six MG/YA novels featuring protagonists with albinism:

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor
Ghost Boy by Iain Lawrence
Golden Boy by Tara Sullivan
The Badger Knight by Kathryn Erskine
The Likes of Me by Randall Beth Platt
The Tragedy Paper by Elizabeth Laban

We’re thrilled to see these characters represented! However, public perception of people with albinism is fraught with stereotypes and inaccuracies. We’d love to know how well the characters in these novels were written. Have you read any? What did you think?

Also of interest may be these brief reviews of novels featuring albinistic characters on the website of NOAH, the National Organization for Albinism and Hypopigmentation.

Want more Disability in Kidlit booklists?
Want to review one of these titles for us?

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I wish I had had 10 children," she says. "After Missy, I had two miscarriages and a tubular pregnancy. Not having more is my only regret in life. We were going to adopt, and then Edgar changed his mind. I worry now because there’s nobody for Missy. When the chips are down, the only one who will take you in is a relative.
— From a 1993 People magazine profile of Joan and Melissa Rivers.
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“Every book is an image of solitude. It is a tangible object that one can pick up, put down, open, and close, and its words represent many months if not many years, of one man’s solitude, so that with each word one reads in a book one might say to himself that he is confronting a particle of that solitude”
Paul Auster
via maya47000

“Every book is an image of solitude. It is a tangible object that one can pick up, put down, open, and close, and its words represent many months if not many years, of one man’s solitude, so that with each word one reads in a book one might say to himself that he is confronting a particle of that solitude”

Paul Auster

via maya47000

(via litreactor)

Sep
6th
Sat
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Sweet Iron Waffle in Seattle is as delicious as ever! Roast turkey, havarti and raspberry jam. Not pictured: strong but excellent coffee.

Sweet Iron Waffle in Seattle is as delicious as ever! Roast turkey, havarti and raspberry jam. Not pictured: strong but excellent coffee.

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Long term committed couples can have sex that is progressively more intimate and more exciting.

The catch is that it takes some work. It means owning your emotional baggage and being willing to help your partner through their stuff too. It becomes necessary to completely resolve every disagreement to the point of loving him or her to bits rather than shoving your feelings into the dark recesses of the collective basement of the relationship.

Evoë Thorne, "Profoundly in love," Whole Sex Life - I’ve been reading her blog archives and keep coming away amazed at her insights and bravery. Looking forward to reading with her today in Seattle at 3 pm - details below!

September 6, 3:30-4 pm
Free erotica reading in Seattle

Readings from The Big Book of Submission, The Big Book of Orgasms and Hungry for More with me and local contributors, including Evoë Thorne, Brandy Fox and others.

Center for Sex Positive Culture Annex, 1608 15th Ave W, Seattle, WA 98119 

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I hope that people realise that memoirs are fractured versions of the truth, because when one person writes about their experience, it will always be in their voice, with their memories, which can shift and change over time.

It was interesting to go back through my early childhood with the understanding that I have now of gender fluidity: some of the things that I did I want to hug myself for (not being willing to change who I was to fit in) and some of the things I want to strangle myself for (hating girls for being girls, because it added pressure for me to fit in).

— Liz Prince, author of graphic memoir Tomboy, at Broken Frontier
Sep
5th
Fri
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AS A COWLITZ Indian child, white-skinned and New Jersey-born, I grew up fielding the question, “How much Indian are you?” without any sense of its meaning. Once I was old enough to know that my mother was Indian and my father wasn’t, I began responding “Half.” It wasn’t until my teenage years that I would ask my mother for the details of my ethnic breakdown. She pulled an index card out of her desk drawer. I knew that I was Cowlitz, Polish, Irish, and Ukrainian, but the card was full of surprising facts as well. What did it mean to be Welch? French?

The truly shocking information the card carried was my Indian blood quantum. I didn’t know that was the term for the sum of the fractions next to Cowlitz and Cascade. This was the “How much?” people had prodded me about, and it wasn’t the half I’d assumed. “What are you, a quarter?” people would toss out at times. It wasn’t that. The sum of the Cascade and Cowlitz fractions made an awkward hybrid. I decided it would be nobody’s business.

"I Am Not Pocahontas," Elissa Washuta, The Weeklings. If you’re in Seattle, come hear her read from her memoir My Body Is a Book of Rules Monday night, September 9th, at 7:30 at Elliott Bay Books in Capitol Hill. I’m looking forward to it!