Rachel Kramer Bussel RSS

Books, writing, travel, art, randomness. For more information, visit www.rachelkramerbussel.com and my calendar for upcoming events in NYC, Milwaukee, Albuquerque and Austin. See also Cupcakes Take the Cake and the possibly NSFW Lusty Lady. Check out my newest and best erotica anthology The Big Book of Orgasms: 69 Sexy Stories. rachelkramerbussel at gmail.com

Archive

Apr
15th
Tue
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thebigbookoforgasms:

Rose Caraway, narrator of The Big Book of Orgasms: 69 Sexy Stories audiobook, is offering you free stories. First up is “Pushing Boundaries on Public Transport” by Victoria Blisse, with this great graphic of editor Rachel Kramer Bussel driving a London bus and Rose looking on as the characters get it on. Listen free at The Kiss Me Quick’s podcast.

thebigbookoforgasms:

Rose Caraway, narrator of The Big Book of Orgasms: 69 Sexy Stories audiobook, is offering you free stories. First up is “Pushing Boundaries on Public Transport” by Victoria Blisse, with this great graphic of editor Rachel Kramer Bussel driving a London bus and Rose looking on as the characters get it on. Listen free at The Kiss Me Quick’s podcast.

Apr
11th
Fri
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bookpeopleaustin:

"McCracken’s writing is dark and weirdly funny, exploring the fragility of people and communities." Awesome to see Thunderstruck and Other Stories by Austinite Elizabeth McCracken on The New Yorker’s list of books to look out for in April. 
We’re excited to have this book on our shelves later this month (4/22). Julie read it and has this to say: “McCracken explores the unexpected avenues of loss in this absorbing new collection. What I love about McCracken is knowing that the characters I meet on her pages will never be typical. I come again and again to the little girl dressed as Patrick Henry; a room full of budgies to replace a prodigal son; the emotional terrain of traumatized librarians. The ways we deal with absence are at the heart of each story and its haunting characters. McCracken’s humor brings levity to this unique, memorable collection.”
McCracken reads from and signs her collection here 4/22.

Looking forward to reading this.

bookpeopleaustin:

"McCracken’s writing is dark and weirdly funny, exploring the fragility of people and communities." Awesome to see Thunderstruck and Other Stories by Austinite Elizabeth McCracken on The New Yorker’s list of books to look out for in April. 

We’re excited to have this book on our shelves later this month (4/22). Julie read it and has this to say: “McCracken explores the unexpected avenues of loss in this absorbing new collection. What I love about McCracken is knowing that the characters I meet on her pages will never be typical. I come again and again to the little girl dressed as Patrick Henry; a room full of budgies to replace a prodigal son; the emotional terrain of traumatized librarians. The ways we deal with absence are at the heart of each story and its haunting characters. McCracken’s humor brings levity to this unique, memorable collection.”

McCracken reads from and signs her collection here 4/22.

Looking forward to reading this.

Apr
8th
Tue
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Apr
3rd
Thu
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Apr
1st
Tue
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nicolejhardy:

This is Eric Raymond. He’s not drinking coffee in the photo, but he looks all cool and writerly, so I let it slide. Let’s pretend he’s about to enter his favorite coffee shop, okay? 

A thing Rachel Kushner once said makes sense to me: “Writing is a way of living. It doesn’t quite matter that there are too many books for the number of readers in the world to read them. It’s a way of being alive, for the writer.” I think if you want to make meaning, you have to stop thinking of what you’re doing as a product or an alternative entertainment choice. You might even need to embrace the death of your form.

Eric is the author of the darkly funny, enviably smart Confessions From a Dark Wood. He’s one of those people who gets up at 5 a.m. (or some obscene hour) to write. Like, EVERY DAY. 

nicolejhardy:

This is Eric Raymond. He’s not drinking coffee in the photo, but he looks all cool and writerly, so I let it slide. Let’s pretend he’s about to enter his favorite coffee shop, okay? 

A thing Rachel Kushner once said makes sense to me: “Writing is a way of living. It doesn’t quite matter that there are too many books for the number of readers in the world to read them. It’s a way of being alive, for the writer.” I think if you want to make meaning, you have to stop thinking of what you’re doing as a product or an alternative entertainment choice. You might even need to embrace the death of your form.

Eric is the author of the darkly funny, enviably smart Confessions From a Dark Wood. He’s one of those people who gets up at 5 a.m. (or some obscene hour) to write. Like, EVERY DAY. 

Mar
26th
Wed
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If boys won’t read, and they especially won’t read books with girl protagonists, the solution is not to create more explicitly “boy” books, the solution is to delve deeply into “why.” Why don’t they see value in reading, and what is wrong with the stories of girls? The problem is, of course, as the saying goes, you can’t reason people out of something they didn’t reason into.
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Sex workers should be given equal protection under the law. I want our jobs to be treated as legitimate. Right now, if I were to go to a policeman and report something that happened to me, he would say, “You’re a prostitute, I don’t care.”
Duke University porn star Belle Knox in my interview with her at Elle.com
Mar
22nd
Sat
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This is advice that I am borrowing from Nao Bustamante,which is that you are not responsible for other people’s experience of your work. Even if it’s memoir. If they perceive it in a way you didn’t intend, that’s not on you. You also can’t do anything to change it. Nothing you ever say (or tweet, or write in a letter to the editor of the NYTBR) will ever change anyone’s mind about your book. Your book isn’t for the people who don’t get it, it’s for the people who do. Spend time with them. Roll around in your good reviews. And treat the bad ones with a shrug. Your book just wasn’t for them.
— Hiring a skywriter to inscribe this Emily Gould quote over BEA this year. (via thefeeling)